A Number: Once Upon A Theatre Critic

Mark Cohen and Danny Bryck, Photo Credit by Whistler in the Dark

‘A Number’ of Sons

A Number by Caryl Churchill, Whistler in the Dark, The Factory Theatre, 1/20/12-2/4/12, (in repertory with Fen by Caryl Churchill), http://www.whistlerinthedark.com/productions/wantedsomething.html.

Reviewed by Becca Kidwell

(Boston, MA) If you were/are a parent, what would you do if you had a chance to fix the mistakes you made raising your child? As a child, what would you do if your parents told you that you were not their original child, but a new, improved version made to fix the mistakes they made with their first child? Caryl Churchill’s play, A Number deals with a controversial matter: cloning. Since the Dolly the sheep was cloned in the late nineties, fear and wonder has surrounded the possibility of cloning a human being. This play speculates on what might result from such a procedure and the repercussions of such a decision upon a father and his son. Read more “A Number: Once Upon A Theatre Critic”

Breaking The Code: Once Upon A Theatre Critic

Dafydd ap Rees (Mick Ross) and Allyn Burrows (Alan Turing) in Hugh Whitemore’s BREAKING THE CODE through May 8. Presented by Catalyst Collaborative@MIT. Performances at Central Square Theater at 450 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge. Tickets and Information: http://CentralSquareTheater.org or 866-811-4111. Photo by A.R. Sinclair Photography.

Turing Passes The Test

Breaking the Code by Hugh Whitemore, Underground Railway Theater and Catalyst Collaborative @ MIT, Central Square Theater, 4/7/11-5/8/11. http://www.centralsquaretheater.org/season/10-11/code.html.

Reviewed by Becca Kidwell

Intelligence is a prized commodity that governments and businesses appropriate for their own needs, but don’t always appreciate the ones who provide it. Alan Turing was loved by Great Britain for his decoding work during World War II and was derided for his failure to conform to social norms after the war. Breaking the Code masterfully explores the isolating nature of “polite” society.

Underground Railroad Company and Catalyst Collaborative@MIT bring the audience into the world of Alan Turing’s mind and memory. Performed in the round, the audience literally steps into Janie Howland’s set of inverse geometric spirals as they take their seats. Strings across the walls and ceiling connect formulas and ideas. Following the idea of the spirals, director Adam Zahler has Turing (played by Allyn Burrows) follow these patterns as Turing moves through the various moments of his life. The set and the action become an extension of Alan Turing’s personality. Read more “Breaking The Code: Once Upon A Theatre Critic”